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Choosing a Career

Choosing a Career

Contributed by
Eva Fleming

My nephew loves reading and by age 20 he had read a huge portion of the top recommended books in the U.S., having read a book a week for two years. So it came as no surprise when he announced that he was going to college to become an English professor.

This means that he will pursue a master’s degree once he completes his bachelor degree. His mother was so in tune with her son’s interests that she even said that she would not pay for a single college credit if he chose to pursue a career that did not align with his interests, like accounting.

My daughter, on the other hand, is an artist. She has always loved the arts, sculpture, painting and music, so when she announced she was going to the Art Institute to pursue technical training in Graphic Design, no one batted an eye.

My nieces and nephews have been fortunate because they know their strengths and with the support of their family they have been encouraged to pursue careers that are a good fit for them based on their strengths, values, personality and skills, not social status or social norms.

Choosing a career is one of the most important decisions an individual will make in his or her lifetime. We encourage parents to put aside their own ambition and encourage their children to pursue careers that fit their talents and passion.

The right kind of work provides us with an inner creative joy that no amount of leisure activities can replace. Dullness and boredom can turn work into a burden if we are not interested in what we do. Work can give us a sense of purpose and a channel for our passion.

This is why choosing a career requires some forethought. In order to choose well, you must first know yourself well. You need to get in touch with your strengths, values, personality and skills. Armed with that knowledge, you can then decide if a four-year college education or technical training will help you best embrace your life’s purpose.

Once you assess your likes and dislikes you can consider your options based on your interests. As you narrow down your choices, consider the impact your career choice will have on your life. Ask yourself, what is the financial impact of my career choice, what is the relational impact, and am I willing to live with those consequences?

Following a career path that suits you will enrich your spirit. The ancient proverb says, “the soul of the sluggard craves and gets nothing, while the soul of the diligent is richly supplied.” So be diligent, be purposeful, and choose wisely.

For more resources on personal and professional development,  you can follow Family Bridges on social media @familybridges.

Pine-Sol and Forest Bathing

Pine-Sol and Forest Bathing

Contributed by
Dr. Alicia La Hoz

To this day, when I smell Pine-Sol, I am taken back to the warm, welcoming feeling of being home. Coming back home from school to the fresh scent of Pine-Sol would alert me that my mother was busy cleaning that day.  The opened windows and cleanliness radiating from the tidy home made the impression that the house was not only clean but also that I had been purged of the dirt picked up from the day. The cleanliness of our home would somehow spread over me.

At first I couldn’t put my finger on it. This same clean feeling is what I have experienced during the monthly hikes my family and I have had. Our journey this year has been to take monthly hikes to State Parks. We have braved the rigid cold winter air, welcomed the spring breeze and basked in the warmth of summer. Recently, I ran into a video that nailed down the refreshing feeling felt after such hikes. It talked about forest bathing and how it is shown to boost energy, lower stress hormones, lower heart pressure, and reduce symptoms of depression.  Something about taking in the fresh oxygen and the oils emitted by the trees declutters the mind and refreshes the spirit.

With a heavy week full of to-do’s and decisions waiting to be made, the monthly hikes have become an opportunity to declutter my mind and body. Just like my mothers’ cleaning, the forest hikes are an opportunity to cleanse my spirit from the toxins picked up along life’s journey.   My family has learned that we could do more than what we thought we could, grown closer together, and even gotten quite a bit of exercise in. I even discovered how to just let go and have fun on a regular basis, which is important given my tendency to bury myself in my workload. Many goals lose their initial shine after the first month or two. This journey is just starting to reveal how glorious it is. So what are you waiting for? We are just at the midpoint of the year. Go ahead and take on the journey to explore your region’s parks and perserves; you will discover forests, trails and beaches that are within miles of your home and you will be pleasantly surprised at how good the experiences are for your mind, body and spirit.

Follow my journey with #Aliciasjourney and those of my colleagues with #journeys. For blogs, tips and ideas about life and relationships, follow us @familybridges.

9 Most Awesome 4th of July Hangouts

9 Most Awesome 4th of July Hangouts

Contributed by
Frederick Ford Beckley

The 4th of July is almost here, and you know what that means. Fireworks. #boom

However, thanks to the Pyrotechnic Use Act, it’s illegal to sell, have, or use fireworks in the state of Illinois. So unless you’re really into sparklers, you have to look elsewhere to get your #boom on this Independence Day. #thanksPUA

But don’t worry, I got you. Here are the 10 most awesome 4th of July hangouts, ranked in order of awesomeness.

DISCLAIMER: I’ve never actually been to any of these places. Visit at your own risk. Mentioning my name will get you no discount or benefit of any kind.

Six Flags Great America
What: Ride rollercoasters and splash around at the waterpark before the evening fireworks show.
Where:
1 Great America Parkway, Gurnee, IL
When:
July 2- July 4, 10:30 – 10:00
9:30AM – Early admission, with a can of coke
9:45PM – Fireworks
Admission: $72.99 each at the park/$52.99 each online.
Pro-tip: bring a can of coke (empty or full) to save $15 on park admission ($57.99 each) or save $22 when you tickets online at least one day in advance using promo code “Coke” ($32.99 each).
Family Friendly:
Yes
Down Side: You only get 15 minutes of fireworks before the park closes. Other than that, it’s just another day at Six Flags.
Awesome Level:
1 Firework

Rockin’ In the Park Concert & Fireworks
What: Enjoy a concert by Eagles’ tribute band Heartache Tonight before a grand fireworks display.
Where:
MB Financial Park
5501 Park Place, Rosemont, IL
When: July 4, 7-10PM
Admission: FREE – Parking is free with validation from any of the park’s venues.
Family Friendly:
Not particularly, unless your kids love the smooth sounds of The Eagles.
Down Side: Outside food and coolers are prohibited.
Awesome Level:
2 Fireworks

Taste of Oak Brook
What: Taste food from the finest restaurants of  Oak Brook, check out live music, and enjoy an array of children’s activities – from face painting to a petting zoo to good old fashioned stilt walkers. Food, beverage, and activities require tickets, available all day long for $1 each.
Where: Oak Brook Polo Field
1200 Oak Brook Road, Oak Brook, IL
When:
July 3
4PM – Activities
9PM – Fireworks
Admission: FREE (parking is $10)
Family Friendly:
Yes
Down Side: The parking lot fills quickly, so spots will be difficult to find after 7PM. Also, it’s on the 3rd, not the 4th. But then again, that leaves your 4th free for other activities.
Awesome Level:
3 Fireworks

Navy Pier
What: Ride the 150-foot Ferris wheel, take a cruise out on Lake Michigan, and take in the grand firework display sponsored by the Illinois Lottery. (So that’s where all my lottery ticket money goes, huh?)
Where:
Navy Pier, 600 E. Grand Ave., Chicago, IL
When: July 4 – 9:30PM
Admission: FREE
Family Friendly:
Yes
Down Side: Paid parking can get pricey – $15-$30.
Awesome Level:
3 & ¾ Fireworks

Mount Prospect Lions Club Festival
What: Grab some pancakes, then enjoy a carnival! $25 gets you 4 hours of unlimited rides. Raffles and musical entertainment run throughout the day, before evening fireworks.
Where: Melas Park – 1326 W. Central Road, Mount Prospect, IL
When:
July 4
Pancake Breakfast – 7-11AM
Festival – 1-11PM
Fireworks – 9:30-10PM
Admission: $25
Family Friendly:
Yes
Down Side: Pancake breakfasts and carnival rides aren’t exactly “best friends”.
Awesome Level:
4 Fireworks

Tinley Park Fourth of July
What: Start the day by running the Stars and Stripes 5K race, then enjoy food, live music, bingo, batting cages, miniature golf, inflatables, face painting, a horseshoe tournament, and free watermelon!
Where: McCarthy Park – 16801 W 80th Ave, Tinley Park, IL
When:
July 4
8-9:30AM: 5K
11AM-8:30PM: Bating Cages & Miniature Golf
4-9:30PM: Activities/Opening Ceremony
9:15-9:30PM: Grand Finale Fireworks Extravaganza!
Admission: FREE
Family Friendly:
Yes
Down Side:
Awesome Level:
4 & ½ Fireworks

Skokie’s 3D Fireworks Festival

What: Yes, that’s right. 3D FIREWORKS.
The first 10,000 patrons receive a free pair of 3D glasses.
A parade kicks the festivities off earlier in the afternoon, and the event is concluded with a concert, children’s games, and face painting.
Where:
Parade – Oakton Street, east from Downtown to Oakton Park
Fireworks and Festival – Niles West High School – 5701 Oakton Street
Skokie, IL
When:
July 4
12PM – Parade
5PM – Fireworks and Festival
6:30PM – Concert
Admission: FREE
Family Friendly:
Yes
Down Side: None. Unless you’re the 10,001st person there. :(

Awesome Level: 4 & ¾ Fireworks

Naval Station Great Lakes Fourth of July
What: Get your annual does of “fire-crackin’ festival fun” with live bands, carnival rides, games, kids activities, the award-winning Kids Zone, an indoor rock wall, bingo, paintball, and roving costumed characters. “Spectacular fireworks will be CHOREOGRAPHED TO MUSIC … and visitors are promised a ‘must-see’ fireworks extravaganza.”
Where: Ross Field; Great Lakes Naval Base – Sheridan Road, Great Lakes, IL
When:
July 3 & 4, 3-10PM
9:30PM – Fireworks
Admission: FREE
Family Friendly:
Yes
Down Side: No pets.

Awesome Level: 5 Fireworks
Any Local Rooftop
What: We all have that friend with a rooftop. Or maybe you’re the friend. If so, head on upstairs for a 360-degree exhibition of Chicago’s finest fireworks.
Where:
I don’t know. I’m not psychic.
When:
July 4, dusk, around 9PM
Admission: Depends on your friend.
Family Friendly:
See above.
Down Side: Your friend might ask you to help them move to return the favor.
Awesome Level:
You tell me.

Happy Fourth of July!

For blogs, tips and ideas about life and relationships, follow us @familybridges.

#RichardsJourney: An Open Letter to my Elevator

#RichardsJourney: An Open Letter to my Elevator

Contributed by
Richard Lara

Dear Elevator,

 

Although we have had our highs and our lows, I feel like we are no longer on the same level. Every time we reach new heights you always complain about how much I push your buttons. You’re slow, lazy and never want to go out of your comfort zone. Your attitude just brought me down and because of that I have decided to pursue happiness elsewhere. It hasn’t taken long for me to start dating around.

I first met a Spanish gal named, Lera. Esca Lera. And let me tell you something, she is nothing like you. She motivates me to lift myself up and keeps me active. She’s quite strong and firm and always stands her ground. However, our relationship did not last long. Esca Lera would let anyone step on her and she never stood up against it. I tried helping her, but surprisingly, she was okay with getting stepped on. It was just a never-ending story with her. I just didn’t want the same to happen to me, so I left.

I continued the search for my other half. Days and nights passed as I sought after a partner. I ran and ran thinking my soulmate was miles away when in reality she was just around the corner. Although I only ran a 5K, it felt like I ran from LA NYC. And that’s when I met Giná.

I was lucky to find Giná Sio considering she’s Portuguese. I mean, what are the odds, right? I found that Giná is everything I was looking for. She’s social, active, self-motivated and always stays fit. She constantly encourages me to take on new challenges such as swimming, cycling, HIIT classes or yoga. I visit her about 3-5 days a week, and I always look forward to spending time with Giná Sio. She is my new addiction.

I’m sorry things could not work out between us, Elevator. But don’t beat yourself up because it wasn’t your fault. It wasn’t you, it was me.

Take care,

 

Richard

 

Follow my journey with #RichardsJourney and those of my colleagues with #Journeys2017

For blogs, tips and ideas about life and relationships, follow us @familybridges.

My Husband as a Father

My Husband as a Father

Contributed by
Eva Fleming

I don’t know about you but sometimes I observe and reflect about what kind of father my husband is to my children and a sly grin of satisfaction passes through my lips. He is not the fun, energetic dad that tosses his children up in the air or spends time with them in the basketball court. Yet, as I see my children growing and maturing, becoming independent and embracing life, I have to admit this reserved man has done something right. Why else are my children so adaptable, hardworking, responsible, respectful and focused? Is it perhaps, because they have the steady hand of a dad that takes them to karate practice every week, trusts them with big jobs, sets high expectations, and provides the resources for them to succeed? I believe it is.

My husband has been providing for our family physically and financially for almost three decades. But best of all he provides a stable home where love and trust can flourish. I have made the following observations about the type of fathering that goes on under my roof:

  1. My husband’s fatherhood is an expression of masculinity. True masculinity models healthy compassionate relationship behavior. This is good for my boys because they are learning to find their role and place in society by the power of modeling. And it is great for my daughter because the primary way she has learned how men should behave in a healthy relationship has been by watching her father. Most divorce and domestic violence happens to men and women who grew up without a father modeling compassionate relationship behavior (Steve Stosney, Ph.D)
  2. My husband’s role is integral to the wellbeing of our family. I know what the fatherhood research says about fatherhood and the list is long. Check out David Blankenhorn book Fatherless America. He says that, “fatherlessness is the most harmful demographic trend of this generation.” But our family has benefitted from emotionally stable children who exceed in school, don’t exhibit behavioral disorders, and don’t engage in aggressive behaviors all because, I’m sure, there is solid fatherhood happening in our home.
  3. Fatherhood has been good for my husband. The biochemistry and neural activity that kicked into his brain after he became a dad has literally kept him alive and focused. Loving a child and sacrificing personal comfort for their success and well-being has indeed turned my husband from a typical selfish bachelor to a complete selfless human. Perhaps he pushes it to the limit since he still drives a 15-year-old car to make financial sacrifices to benefit his children.

If you ask my kids about their dad, this is the first thing they will tell you: “When I ask dad about something, he goes more in depth than I thought possible. He looks at thing from all the angles, he is really thorough. Which lets me know that he really cares and wants me to make the best decision I can make. He truly has my success in mind.”

In my house my husband is honored for his character which, come to think of it, is the reason my sisters and I honored my own father. He was passionate, principled, forgiving, and compassionate. My husband is honest, responsible, trustworthy, and detailed. What about you or the special father in your house? What character trait are you passing down to your children? Whether you are an active, adventurous, affectionate dad or a reserved, steady, determined dad, society needs you, and so does your family.

While Hollywood’s portrayal of fathers in roles like those of Homer Simpson with his crude, short-tempered, neglectful, clumsy, lazy, heavy drinking, ignorant and idiotic personality may be comical, it’s definitely incomplete and thankfully does not represent the many awesome dads that I know are out there. These days’ fatherhood is on the rise and boy, am I thankful for that!

For more blogs, tips and ideas about life and relationships, follow us @familybridges.

Surprised by Love

Surprised by Love

Contributed by
Bill Ferrell

“I am dead.”

These were the first words that filled my head when I woke up.

Of course, I didn’t think that I was literally dead. I meant that I was in a lot of trouble.

I was a sophomore in high school and the night before I had gone to a movie with my best friend, Don. I drove my parent’s car to the movie. However, Don drove the car home because I couldn’t. I was drunk.

I would like to state for the public record that it was Don’s fault. I would like to say that Don made me get drunk. I would like to say that he threatened to hurt me if I did not match him beer for beer. I would like to say that, but of course that’s not true. I drank freely. That is not to say that the beer was free. In fact, I was the one who paid for it.

When I arrived home, my parents knew exactly what I had been doing. It was the first (and last) time I had consumed that amount of alcohol. Therefore, I was not good at hiding it. The fact that I had gotten sick on the way home, couldn’t stand up, and that someone else was driving their car probably made them suspicious.

In the morning I woke up and immediately felt sick to my stomach. Not from the alcohol, but from knowing that I was in trouble. I laid curled up under the covers, hoping that I had just dreamt the whole thing. But the voices coming from the kitchen brought me into reality. I couldn’t hear what they were saying, but I could tell my father was upset. Very upset. I had never heard my father that way. Of course, he had never seen me drunk either. He generally was an even-tempered man. He seldom raised his voice. But that morning his volume was turned all the way up.

And for good reason. I had been irresponsible. I had violated their trust. I had lied to them. His anger was justified. And I felt horrible.

I decided not to delay the inevitable any longer. I slowly opened my bedroom door. Suddenly there was silence. I walked into the kitchen and sat down. I had avoided eye contact until that moment. I looked up, bracing myself to meet a burst of anger along with a speech about being a colossal disappointment. Instead, I was surprised.

With tears in his eyes, my father stood me up, hugged me, and said, “thank God you are safe.”

I realized in that moment his upset was not because I had disobeyed him or broken the law or had done something incredibly stupid. It was because he loved me.

I had been expecting punishment and yet I received grace. I was deserving wrath and yet I received kindness.  

I learned something that day. I learned that no matter what I did, my father would always love me. I learned that his love was not dependent on my obedience to rules, or compliance to his will, or even to common sense.

He loved me. Period.

I have learned over the years that I am deeply loved, as my father loved – and as our Father in Heaven loves.

When we experience that kind of love – we experience life.

P.S. I was grounded from driving the car for 4 weeks. True love also protects. Even if it’s from yourself.

For more blogs, tips and ideas about life and relationships, follow us @familybridges.

It’s not OK

It’s not OK

Contributed by
Sarah Pichardo

If you ever wonder what’s wrong with this world and this generation, just read a Cosmopolitan article, watch an MTV show, or take a look at Snapchat’s featured stories. I came across an article today titled, “I Love Dating My Married Boyfriend”. I kid you not. That’s the actual title…and that’s exactly what the article was about. Please, world, tell me that it’s not just me that sees something devastatingly wrong with that.

Here’s the thing. I know that there is a small percentage of people who think this is perfectly fine and that the rest of you do agree with me and do see something wrong with that.  And that we are just over here like, “For real though? What’s wrong with you?” That’s the bright side of this blog/rant. The not so bright side is that this is what media outlets are shoving down everyone’s throat – ALL THE TIME.

We’re becoming a desensitized people. Because the more you push the boundaries and limits, the more common and acceptable something becomes…the more you have to keep pushing boundaries until there’s nothing left to push.

Nothing is off limits. Everything is acceptable. There is no such thing as right or wrong.

When is enough, enough? I’m a bit saddened and concerned at where our culture will be in 20 years. A place with no moral objectivity.

There is no one who can influence your children more than you. Take advantage of it while you can. Talk to your kids about your beliefs and about what you expect from them. Teach them about right and wrong. Talk to them about relationships, sex, drugs, politics, religion, life. Don’t assume they will learn it on their own. If you don’t talk to them, they will learn things from their friends, from school and from what they read online and see on TV. And don’t just talk to them about it, but show it in your daily actions.

Not everything is OK. And it’s OK to say so.

For more blogs, tips and ideas about life and relationships, follow us @familybridges.

Want to Raise Great Kids?

Want to Raise Great Kids?

Contributed by
Bill Ferrell

Do you want to raise an emotionally deficient child? A child who questions their value and worth? Someone who seeks approval and love from others in unhealthy ways? A child who believes that they must find someone else to “complete them” because on their own they are incomplete?

If you do – you are sick and I would like you to hand your child over to me immediately.

OUR NATURAL PARENTING STYLE

However, I am assuming, that is not the case. Like most parents, you love your child(ren). However, all of us come into parenting unprepared. It is truly an “on-the-job” learning experience. Primarily our own Family Of Origin (FOO) experience informs our parenting paradigm. That can be both healthy and unhealthy. It all depends – and is usually a bit of both.

WE NEED TO BE SELF-AWARE

“That was how I was raised and I turned out alright” is not always the best parenting principle. Maybe your parents did a great job in raising you. Or maybe they were working out of some deficiencies in their own lives (like all of us) and they got some things right and they got some things wrong. That’s called “being human.” There is no value in “parent bashing,” – recounting all the things they did wrong.

However, it is important to know that two imperfect human beings (your parents) couldn’t help but pass on some of their imperfections to you. You can’t escape that. In addition, you probably picked up some imperfections all on your own. I know I did.

The important thing to know is that what we learned from our FOO probably is not enough. We need help. We need to be intentional. We need additional input and resources. We all do. One excellent resource is a book and podcast called The Struggle is Real. They are designed to raise extraordinary kids in the 21st century.

START HERE

This brief blogpost is not enough to cover all the topics necessary in raising healthy children. However, there is one thing you can start doing today that can make a HUGE difference.

Tell your children, “I love you.”

Yes, I have the gift of stating the obvious. However, no matter how obvious this appears, children can’t hear this too much. Adults can’t hear this too much. Of the hundreds of people I have counseled over the years, a reoccurring issue among people in crisis relationships is that they rarely heard “I love you” from their parents.

Now, I am not saying these are magic words that will result in raising perfect children and healing all wounds. Of course not. (That’s why you need resources like The Struggle is Real). Words are not enough. There must be love in action to back them up. However, they are a start. And they can have a HUGE impact.

START TODAY

So today – tell your child, “I love you.” If you don’t have children – tell your parents, your spouse, a friend. We all need to hear it. Feeling loved is foundational to living an extraordinary life.

Let’s give that gift to our children and loved ones!

For more tips and ideas about life and relationships, follow us @familybridges.

When Life Gives You Lemons, You Make Lemonade

When Life Gives You Lemons, You Make Lemonade

Contributed by
Omaira Gonzalez

Recently my husband and I went for a long walk at a nearby forest preserve.  This was a new location for us, and we enjoyed exploring the nature around us.  After an hour or so we noticed that we had been walking in circles around the same spot!  We chuckled a bit as we couldn’t believe we never noticed that we kept passing the same bench or sitting area.  We began to search for a path that would lead us back on track to our car.

Our travelling plans have been somewhat of the same experience.  Our goal was to travel more this year; however, we have come across some paths that have kept us going in circles.  I call these paths the “unexpected,” like when life throws you a curve ball. However, as the saying goes “when life gives you lemons, you make lemonade,” and we have learned to make the best of these moments and grow from them. My husband and I started to think of creative ways to continue exploring and traveling without spending too much money.  We started to visit the Forest Preserves in our area each weekend.  I started to observe that many families go on these trails,  going on walks and picnics. We were so encouraged by this that we started to take our family on our trail walks to enjoy some quality time together.  It is free, great exercise, and you can bring a picnic basket with some of your favorite foods.

Though my husband and I did not anticipate the setbacks that we came across this year, we did learn that there are so many other ways to appreciate each other, spend quality time together, and save money.  We did schedule a vacation trip to one of destinations on our bucket list and we allowed ourselves enough time to pay it off, all we need to take with us is spending money.

We know that when it rains it pours, and we have learned to keep an umbrella nearby and to not be discouraged. Difficult times have given us incentive to look outside of the box for opportunities to create valuable experiences.

You can stay up to date with my journey on social media with #OmairasJourney.

For more tips and ideas about life and relationships, follow us @familybridges.

Get Serious About Fun

Get Serious About Fun

Contributed by
Bill Ferrell

Last year my son turned 30, so we decided to do something special.

We surprised him.

My wife, daughter, and I flew to Boston where he is living with his wife and three daughters. He didn’t know we were coming. Only his wife did. We arrived at 1:00 am. That’s right – the hour after midnight. Hey, we wanted to surprise him.

Once we landed, we took an Uber to their place. We texted our daughter-in-law and she was waiting to let us in. Very quietly we walked to their bedroom and opened the door.

There he laid. Under the thick down comforter. It reminded me of when he was a little baby. My wife and I would steal into his room at night and watch him sleep. Listening to the steady rhythm of his breathing. Watching his little chest move up and down with every breath. Deep asleep. So restful. So peaceful. So innocent. So vulnerable. So content. So beautiful. Laying there like a precious little cherub.

And then as quietly as we had entered, we would walk out. Making certain not to wake him.

Now he was 30 years old. Some things had not changed. Oh – but other things had.

On my signal, the three of us jumped on the bed. I straddled his body with my wife and daughter on either side. We yelled, “SURPRISE. SURPRISE. SURPRISE.”

Like a rocket he sat upright in bed and screamed, “AHHHHHHHHHHHH.”

We continued to yell, “SURPRISE. SURPRISE. SURPRISE.”

He continued to scream, “AAHHHHHHHHHHHH.”

His eyes darted back and forth. From face to face. His brain was trying to make sense of all this. Was this a dream? Reality? A nightmare?

He continued to scream and we started to laugh. Hard. My daughter fell on the ground – trying not to pee her pants. My wife could hardly breathe. I continued to yell, “Surprise.”

Finally, after two minutes, he was silent. He grabbed his chest. His escalated blood pressure was beginning to return to normal. He swallowed, trying to catch his breath. Looked around. And then across his face a smile began to spread.

“You got me,” he said. Success!

We spent the next few days celebrating him and his birthday – going out to eat, playing basketball, talking, hanging out, recounting “the surprise,” and having fun. Lots of fun.

Children are a gift from God. Parenting is an incredible privilege and an amazing responsibility. And it can also be a lot of fun.

Make time to have fun with your kids. No matter their age.

For their sake and for yours. Fun is an important part of relationships and life!

Now, your version of “fun” may not be the same as “Ferrell Family Fun.” But whatever it is –Create memories that you will enjoy in the moment and for years to come.

 

For more tips and ideas about life and relationships, follow us on social media @familybridges.